Thursday, July 21, 2016

Bigfoot Coffee Wars!

Sasquatch Coffee's Gunnar Monson has nothing on Mark and Sandy Klien who own a Bigfoot coffee stand!

Our friend from Monster X Radio, Gunnar Monson, has a small coffee business he runs on the side called Sasquatch Coffee. Alas, he is not the only person making money off of Bigfoot's name and notoriety. Meet the Kliens. they were featured recently in the Washington Herlad and their Bigfoot coffee stand. Whats the difference? The Kliens are big business with souvenirs and their coffee stand actually having been featured in a bigfoot movie, Harry and the Hendersons. Sorry Gunnar, you lose this round.

From The Washington Herald:

No bodacious bikini baristas at this coffee stand.

The attraction is a hairy dude with big feet.

And that’s if you get lucky.

What’s up with that?

Sandy and Mark Klein know flesh and cleavage aren’t the only espresso perks that work. They’ve have been cashing in on Bigfoot for more than 25 years at the Espresso Chalet on U.S. 2.

The mythical primate is the theme at this java joint, though his appearances are suspect.

“He was here earlier,” Mark told me with a straight face. “He brought some huckleberries and we traded it for a latte.”

Mark, a 60-year-old in a Bavarian hat and a mischievous grin, admits he says that 100 times a day to customers asking “Where’s Bigfoot?”

Bigfoot’s likeness is everywhere at the chalet that sits against the backdrop of Mount Index. There are Bigfoot signs, statues, souvenirs, specials and footprints.

But sightings are dubious of the rockstar ape.

Oh, ​​well. At least you can drink like a Sasquatch.

Six bucks buys the 32-ounce Bigfoot Quad.

​A Stevens Passquatch latte is $3.25. The $5 Lift Ticket has four shots of espresso with heavy cream in an 8-ounce cup.

Coffee separates the humans from the apes.

There are 187 flavors, including Vampire Blood. The dozen milk choices include hemp, goat and almond.

Giant — really, they are huge — Bigfoot cookies, handmade by Sandy, are a steal for $2.50.

Much to the relief of many tourists, hikers and skiers along this scenic but lonely stretch of highway, there are two portable toilets. Wait. Not so fast. The doors are locked. To get the key to the door you have to buy something.

“There is no minimum purchase,” Mark said. “Pick up a stick of gum. It’s a little show of graditude and it helps pay for maintenance of the toilets. The toilets cost us $3,000 a year. We’re not Starbucks. We’re not McDonald’s.”

Click here for the rest of the article.

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